Garden

The “civilized” area of Beaver Willows where we decide what will grow- 

“Some…like to make a little garden out of life and walk down a path.”(Jean Anouilh)
 Welcome to the chronicles of our garden- a running account of the cultivated areas of our yard.

July 2014

 

June 2014

 


May 4, 2014

Last year we accomplished one of the best, and most rewarding, home improvements our yard has ever experienced… the construction, planting, and harvesting of raised garden beds! These photographs tell the story, without words, of the magic that has occurred here since July 2013 when our backyard “farming” started to look hopeful. After the first heavy frost put an end to the growing season, we were grateful for the food we grew in our back yard, sad to see the production end, and started dreaming for spring…

Spring is here and we are inspired by the bounty of our first harvests of vegetables. We are anxious to get seeds and starts planted. Although we had a week of very warm, summer-like weather at the end of April- first two days of May… there is still danger of heavy frost.  And so, we proceed with caution in not planting too soon.  Our garden guide provided assurance that sowing Romaine lettuce is ok.  The seeds have been in the ground since April 2nd; and they are beginning to sprout! Raspberry canes went crazy; we must decide how to handle two plants gone to dozens! The Delicious Apple Tree blossomed profusely during the last week of April and was visited by a healthy band of honey bees and bumble bees!

July 2013 – February 2014

The frames for our first raised-bed garden were completed at the end of June. This collection of photographs showcases the planting and growth of our first backyard crop of vegetables.

8 comments

    1. Thank you, Sheri. The raised beds were in lieu of vacation last year! But, so worth the time and investment. (We laughed last summer when we estimated the costs per pound of our produce!) Marigolds are companion plants. This is info from Farmers Almanac-Pests
      Farmers and gardeners have long known that marigolds make important companion plants all over the garden. Not only does the scent of the marigold (Tagetes spp.) repel animals and insects, but the underground workings of the marigold will repel nematodes (microscopic worms) and other pests for up to 3 years.

      Also have heard they discourage aphids…

      Jane

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      1. Yes, companion planting has been a stalwart principle of organic gardening for a long time. Louise Riotte’s book, “Carrots Love Tomatoes” helped to popularize the idea way back in 1976, and her book is still in print!

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