Great Backyard Bird Count: February 16, 2015

 Last Bird Count for this year:

Another outstanding mid-February day here in the Portland, Oregon area.

Bird activity remained light again today, even thought weather remained unseasonably warm and sunny.

Dark-eyed Juncos were the predominant species spotted today.

Time of observation: 1:00 PM to 4:00. Location: tree/shrub line edge of wetland riparian zone.

This is my count: Dark-eyed Junco-11; Song Sparrow-3; Mourning Doves-7; Black-capped Chickadees-4 ; House Finch-2; Belted Kingfisher-1

 Observations:


8 comments

    1. Chickadees and little birds do tend to take some patience, I agree with you! They tend to do a lot of flitting around.
      Lola Jane, just be aware, once you have a “proper camera”… then you’ll probably start wanting a collection of lenses to go with it! At least that’s what is happening to me. Now the patience comes in waiting to save up the money… lol 😉

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  1. Chickadees and Juncos are some of my favorite birds to watch. Both birds have a rufous coloring that is absent here on the East Coast. Seeing the Great Northwest is at the top of my bucket list.

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    1. Donna, that’s great to hear seeing the Northwest is on your bucket list! My husband and I ventured here upon the advice of a professor at Penn State many years ago. My husband graduated with a degree in Environmental Science, Oregon was a good suggestion. As newlyweds, we decided to leave Pennsylvania (we both grew up in Abington) and give the professor’s idea a try. I don’t think anyone at the time thought we would be gone long… well, it’s been 41 years and we’re still here and remain ever in awe with this part of the country. Moral of the story- you may stay in the Northwest longer than you expected 🙂
      ~Jane

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  2. I admire your patience, Jane, waiting for those great shots. The first thing that strikes me is that they are all ‘little’ birds. We just don’t get the smaller birds as much as we used to years ago. Creeping suburbia is largely to blame. Sad.

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