Weekly Photo Challenge: “Angular” Works in Geologic Time

 Virgin River Gorge
Northwest Arizona at the Utah Border…DSC_2414
Faulted, fractured, tilted Paleozoic and Mesozoic rock layers:
Conglomerate, limestone, siltstone, chert, shale, and gypsum…
become the geometric tools of geology.

Cliffs stand in near vertical faces.

Landslides tumble rock into slopes as erosion undercuts massive beds.

Caves open along fractures and bedding plains.

Weaker stones warp and fold.

Earth layers angled by convergent plate action rise up…
300 million years engulf travelers on the Interstate.
DSC_2391
As fuel, just as old,
propels us
DSC_2444
 through geologic wonders of the Colorado Plateau-

 Amid angles only time and Nature can bend.
DSC_2453

 Science behind this post:
Geologic Conditions and Highways in 1973

Weekly Photo Challenge: Angular

24 comments

  1. enjoyed these images. they remind me of a road trip through Arizona/Utah to the Grand Canyon, north and south rims, and many other canyons. that was long before i had a digital camera, but it was so amazing. i remember saying from time to time, ‘we are on the moon!’ although Mars would have probably been more appropriate 🙂
     
    we live on such a fascinating planet, don’t we? thanks for sharing.

    Like

    1. Hello Kris-
      Yes! I agree with you; we do live on a fascinating planet. So much to see and learn about!

      Sounds like we traveled very similar paths, although we didn’t get to the Grand Canyon. Our road trip just happened to coincide with the government shut-downs in 2013- that National Park was closed. But- we were very lucky that our itinerary included Utah. We traveled across the border at the same time the Governor of Utah pledged funding for the opening of National Parks in his state. We enjoyed a very memorable trip to Zion National Park.

      Your comment about feeling like being on the moon or on Mars causes me to remember a trip to Craters of the Moon in Idaho. The cinder cones and volcanic scenery there is very appropriately named. 🙂

      Wishing you a lovely holiday season-
      ~Jane

      Like

  2. Sure beats billboards and fast-food rest stops. 🙂
    I’m so used to thinking that rain and wave action are what cause rock to erode. What about the rock in your photos? Wind? Their own weight?

    Like

    1. Funny to mention billboards and rest stops… there were also plenty of those on the trip when these photos were taken- I was especially amused by those along the freeways in Utah!
      As for erosion- a lot of forces are a play with that process: weathering, water movement, wind, rock composition, gravity, and time.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Stunning photographs. I recognize many of these sights as I have passed through Southern Utah and this region a few times. The Virgin River photo is my favorite. A friend of mine recommended the book, “Embrace Your Inner Wild: 52 Reflections for an Eco-Centric World,” by author Mary Reynolds Thompson. This book is an antidote the world of high-tech, high-stress and hyper-rationality. It invites us to reclaim our wild souls and our place in the great community of rivers, forests, peaks, and pastures.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s